Menu

Horror

Rianne's Score (Click post title for review)
Readers' Score (Click the stars to rate)
[Total: 0    Average: 0/5]

Direction
Story & Screenplay
Cinematography
Production Design
Sound & Music
Editing
VFX/Animation (if any)
Acting/Voice Acting
Commercial Flair
Average

Provocative and absorbing but without any pronouncement, “The Exorcism of Emily Rose” is a thinking person’s demon possession film. This hybrid of horror and courtroom drama approaches its compelling subject matter with metaphysical horror within a courtroom procedure format. It presents both the scientific and religious sides of the controversial exorcism case of a 19-year old German girl battling a terribly neurotic or psychotic disorder or a dreadful possession of six demons. It discusses the intersection of faith and science and makes both a person’s mundane and spiritual foundations shake.

This relatively gore-free film is an intelligent inquiry about the limitations of belief and faith in defense to a more scientific interpretation of things. Though the marketing of the film obviously tried to ride on with the prominence of Linda Blaire’s “Exorcist” films, it is not exactly a rip-off. Its flashback style gives justification to the courtroom set, which paves way to a more solid ground of putting arguments in their own places. This validates the aim to make the audience think and really use their heads in coming up with their own judgments concerning faith and spirituality vs. objective truth and secularism.

This psychological thriller presents both the scientific and supernatural insights in the case of Emily Rose, which is based on the true-story of the life of Anneliese Michel. Overall, it is more psychological than the horror an audience expects for an exorcism movie. Unlike the usual demonic-possession movies wallowing in the gore of green vomit, 360 degrees head turn, and levitations, this film stays in the natural world with its own kind of realistic sense of gore and trauma. But still, the subtle but striking supernatural and horror elements presented here tend to give goosebumps of another level.

The story evolves around a negligent homicide case involving Father Moore (Tom Wilkinson) who has performed an exorcism to the late Emily Rose (Jennifer Carpenter). Ironically, the church chooses hotshot criminal attorney Erin Bruner (Laura Linney), an agnostic and ambitious lawyer, to take on as the defense attorney. On the other side of the courtroom is the prosecutor Ethan Thomas (Campbell Scott), a devout Protestant.

Jennifer Carpenter’s incredible performance is the film’s major asset. Seeing Emily possessed as she shouts latin words in demonic voices, scratches walls with her nails, twitches robotically and falls to the ground so realistically, is absolutely terrifying. From her physical features to her acting chops, she turns out perfect for the role. Her twitching and snappy moves when possessed or when having unusual epileptic attacks, the way the doctor and the prosecutor see it, require great physical skills and are considerably stunts of great proportion — and they all turn out so creepy.

The subtle parallelism of Emily’s experiences to the physical manifestations of the dark forces on defense lawyer Linney as Bruner makes an effective ground on inquisitive prodding of objectivity, insanity, and spirituality. It adds cinematic dimension to the film without going too much. Her ending speech is commendable. Its content could have been a melodramatic monologue without Linney’s acting prowess. Wilkinson gives a dignified performance as the embattled priest. He plays the character well as he exudes his faith in God in battling the dark, powerful forces surrounding Emily Rose even until the court trial. However, Scott’s interpretation of his role as the prosecutor makes him more like an antagonist. He could have performed the role more objectively and not in a too antagonistic way. Emily’s family and close friend Jason effectively stays on the background, yielding to the story’s focus on the trial and the real reason for Emily’s death. The internal struggle of each character shakes the viewers’ own physical and supernatural struggles as human beings.

“The Exorcism of Emily Rose” is not for those who want gore “Linda Blaire-style.” The type of scare it brings doesn’t rely on horror stingers and music and physical gore. Its utilization of silence speaks much more. The devil’s presence is simply a shadowy figure in a robe. The scare factor includes simple movements of door, flickering lights, breaking glass, and animals going crazy over fear of the devilish presence. The most scenes that rely on some visual effects just include the slight morphing of images and human faces.

Playing around basic lighting and camerawork, the juxtaposition of shots of Emily during the build-up of the possession and exorcism scenes where the demons manifest themselves in Emily’s physical body and mention their names turn out very engaging both cinematically and spiritually — minimalist, yet striking.

As a cinematic presentation, it could have added some dramatic license to the storytelling, but the good thing about the film is that it presents the two opposing sides quite well. It makes the audience think about the possibility of a demon possession but leaves room for one’s own judgment, whether it’s really a spiritual or a physical battle. And yet, it doesn’t end there. This motion picture imparts an engaging issue about life and spirituality for the audience to think about.


‘The Exorcism of Emily Rose’ Film Review: Courtroom psychological horror
Rianne's Score (Click post title for review)
Readers' Score (Click the stars to rate)
[Total: 3    Average: 2.7/5]

Nasaan Ka Man movie review

Direction
Story & Screenplay
Cinematography
Production Design
Sound & Music
Editing
VFX/Animation (if any)
Acting/Voice Acting
Average

Set in the fog-covered, cold, and mysterious Baguio which reflects the story’s mood and atmosphere, “Nasaan Ka Man” explores the tale of tragic love and passion, undying memories, unfulfilled promises, and lost dreams.

The film opens with a horror feel crawling into its slowly unfolding love story — musing into a suspense-filled route that somehow extends to the issues of the paranormal. A touch of horror gets injected every now and then.

The plot takes on different hues and dimensions for the usual love-triangle fare. Filled with metaphors, finely orchestrated camera movements, and breathtaking visuals, the film’s heaviness works well with its cinematographical style and acting performances. Many visual elements absorb deep-rooted emotions, which are often troubling, secretive, mysterious, violent, or painful.

The narrative revolves around the three adoptive children of two spinster sisters. An epitome of a happy, religious, and conservative family from the outside, this unique family set-up is filled with repression and tragic memories from the inside. Family complications, jealousy, and revenge try to tear them apart. The composite world the two sisters created for their three adoptive children becomes a contrived space of fragility and emotional disturbance of varying magnitudes.

The screenplay by Ricky Lee and Rafael Hidalgo, as well as the direction by Cholo Laurel, offer convincing justification on what happens in the story. This cinematic offering’s direction provides rich characterization for the ensemble cast. Each major character is well-crafted both inside and out. On the physical, emotional, and psychological planes, the viewers can see through each of the characters’ persona. The gray characters aptly contribute to the story structure’s suspense and complications.

The quirkiness of Trining’s (Hilda Coronel) slightly deaf character and her passive bearing to her sister’s authority inside their prison-like home becomes a source of comic relief for the serious tale. Lilia’s (Gloria Diaz) domineering old-maid stance covers up her sadness through her flair for make-up. Pilar’s (Claudine Baretto) initially loving and innocent nature transforms into a confounded, fear-stricken temperament. Her opened third eye and her being a product of sin and violence are later revealed as part of the family’s deep secrets. Joven’s (Jericho Rosales) kind, introvert bearing as the outcast adopted child ironically grows up filled with inspiration and thoughtfulness through his love for Pilar. Ito’s (Diether Ocampo) overprotected adolescent son leads to jealousy and trouble as his repression from his silent obedience to the rules of the house gets the better of him.

Pilar and Joven fight for their love until they are finally granted the family’s blessing. Ito, totally-wrecked by this, gets his revenge by violating Pilar. Trining is sympathetic to Pilar’s plight, but Lilia is more concerned with his favorite son Ito. The deliberation among them becomes a realistic reflection of how it goes within a typically conservative Filipino family in such turmoil. As the story progresses, Ito rages further as he knows he really can’t own Pilar’s heart. Soon, violence causes a tragic death in the family.

There is parallelism between the fate of the spinsters and their adopted children. Though there are some questions on the believability of the storyline, the suspension of disbelief in the turn of events works beyond the issues of realism and paranormal insights.

Baretto delivers a complicated and delicate portrayal as Pilar. Her rape scene is truly gripping. The tight and distorted shots greatly contribute to the story’s heavily emotional moments. The said scene deliberately gives the worst feeling for the viewer. There is enough room for steady development with the dynamics between the sibling characters of Rosales and Ocampo. The chemistry between the spinster sibling roles of Diaz and Koronel effectively utilizes silence and shock to push the material further. Irma Adlawan’s character as a blind helper with an opened third eye and Katherine Luna as her daughter who turns out as a willing victim at a certain point in the story both become the weaving factors in the narrative.

The film is filled with a number of intense scenes of romance, argumentation, and fighting. The love scenes are passionate and gentle. The dramatic scenes are subtle and sincere. The violent scenes are painful and suggestive.

The scene where Pilar is asked to check the fuse after a blackout while suspense on Ito’s revenge is at its peak seems quite forced into the story just to get her into a dark spot alone. This becomes more unbelievable as a sane person in danger won’t choose to check the fuse at such time and would rather choose to save his or her life, or at least prioritize being on the safe side, especially during a clearly compromised situation.

Although most of its twists resemble the twists of thriving Hollywood offerings, the storytelling maintains a well-handled exposition for the most part.

“Nasaan Ka Man” is emotionally tying and it won’t give that feel-good mood after watching it. Yet, even with a considerably depressing ending, this motion picture is a must-see for those who can take a certain form of heaviness in a film. Amidst its story loopholes, it can still work well for those who prefer pondering on what life has to offer and how people should value things and situations given to them or are still with them.

‘Nasaan Ka Man’ Film Review: A bittersweet tale
Rianne's Score (Click post title for review)
Readers' Score (Click the stars to rate)
[Total: 0    Average: 0/5]

Direction
Story & Screenplay
Cinematography
Production Design
Sound & Music
Editing
VFX/Animation (if any)
Acting/Voice Acting
Average

Following the footsteps of a number of successful Asian horror flicks, Regal Films revives “Bahay ni Lola” with the attempt to further break into the horror genre trend. This sequel is targeted for those who prefer getting the creepy chills inside the dark and cold moviehouse. Unfortunately, it isn’t very scary. In fact, its comic side becomes a more appealing aspect of the presentation.

In this second installment, everything is contrived and way too predictable. The attempt to scare doesn’t really work.

This mainstream fare offers nothing new or interesting for the general audience. Even in its final moments, the story lacks a decent twist or a solid ending. The characters’ emotional parts are questionable, especially upon reaching the resolution time. Turn of events would most likely not affect the viewers’ mood and mindset in any way.

On the technical side, the cinematography generally lives up to the needs of this genre flick. Except for the smoke effect that makes some scenes look fake, the presentable visuals becomes the film’s “bit of saving grace.” Amidst the use of many horror stereotypes, at least, the production design adds a bit of horror atmosphere to the scenes.

This movie couldn’t stand on its own ground even with the typical horror elements utilized in the scenes, which include the white-painted scary faces and uncombed hair, the gory shots of blood and insects, the dark and shadowy lighting, and the generic horror sound design and music. The shock factor is almost nonexistent throughout.

Actors have no venue to showcase top-notch skills on the acting department. There ar inconsistencies in Dingdong Dantes’ character — the sense of mystery and fear his role needs is actually nowhere to be found. Most horror elements are poorly copied from contemporary Asian horror flicks such as “The Ring” and “The Grudge.”

There seems to be no much effort to develop the story. More work on the script could have tracked the film a bit more forward.

Scare and suspense are often lacking in this movie. The comedic aspects, as rendered by the likes of John Lapus and Chokoleit, almost always upstage the scare factor of this B-movie horror flick. With poor vision and execution, the comic relief part really surfaces more than the supposedly scary moments.

‘Bahay ni Lola 2’ Film Review: More comedy than horror
Skip to toolbar