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Still rockin after 7 years… 🙂 If ever you’re flying AirAsia by this November, you may want to check out my film “Technophilia” at the Viddsee channel of the AirAsia free in-flight wifi service. Viddsee selected it for premiere for the program this November (which is my birthday month too) 😉

Thanks, Viddsee!!!

Hi Rianne,

Great news! We’re partnering with AirAsia for the first time to market Viddsee short films to a wider audience across SE Asia. AirAsia has a free inflight wifi service roKKi and we will be having a Viddsee channel under the entertainment section for audience to watch Viddsee short films!

We programme 10 new shorts every month in the channel, and we’re excited to select your film “Technophilia” for the month of November!

Regards,
Nikki

“Technophilia” has been the last independent film i shot to date (i know, it’s been way too long), and i so miss shooting indie films really. Shooting commercial/corporate works for years now to pay the bills. But hopefully i can finally find time to shoot another indie film soon. It’s been so long overdue. Sigh…

And i so miss my production team too. From my staff to my cast, everything was so fun and memorable. It’s not only my shortest short to date, it’s also the shortest i shot — about 6 hours from grind to wrap. And i guess it would be the last i would ever shoot in celluloid (and most likely the last i would shoot without a video assist), unless budget and prod requirements lead me back to film in the future… But i sure do hope i can manage to shoot another international production like this again (my team here was composed of: Iraqi, Korean, American, Japanese, Indonesian, Taiwanese, and Filipino). Indeed, filmmaking can end up communicating beyond the confines of language and even cultural differences — where storytelling becomes a universal language to touch people’s lives.


My Film ‘Technophilia’ Now at AirAsia’s In-flight Wi-Fi Service Via the Viddsee Channel
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After getting one of my films on Viddsee last year (Thanks to Alem Ang for curating my film for it), this time, I got invited to be a Viddsee curator:

“It’s great to have you join us in this journey with your film up on Viddsee! We’re looking for a community of awesome curators to help surface Asian stories from their own countries!

We believe in the future of digital cinema we’re currently building. Love to grow these communities of filmmakers, audiences and creative influencers with your support in what we do 🙂

Our curators have been recommending good films to us from where they are. Will you be interested in curating Asian films together with us?”

So if you guys have an awesome short that you would want to be part of the #Viddsee community of Asian short films, kindly email me the (private or public) link at: awitkulayan@gmail.com. Hopefully, you will soon be part of our growing filmmaking community that features awesome shorts across Asia.

Got Invited as Viddsee Curator, Send Your Films!
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Rianne Hill Soriano Demo Reel

This three-minute reel features selected directorial project clips from both my commercial works and independent films.

These excerpts showcase animation, motion graphics and interactive video productions, emotion pieces with kid, family, couple, and adult characters, diverse genre scenes, natural and man-made tourist attractions, industrial spaces, and realty structures.

Music inspired by Ghostpocalypse by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 and arranged and mixed by Philip Arvin Jarilla.

Please watch in HD if you can. Thanks!

Rianne Hill Soriano Director’s Showreel
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My most personal edited project to date; our most personal video collaboration to date. Thanks to our frequent collaborator production designer Joy who made my GoPro bridal bouquet inspired by our “Denim Neo-classic” theme. Like the designs for our wedding, the bridal bouquet used recycled materials as well.

I shot my own wedding and my husband, who frequently collaborates with me on my film and commercial projects as sound engineer and/or scorer, worked on the audio requirements.

For the most part, this wedding film was shot on a first-person perspective, giving a raw, more personal and genuine chronicling of a wedding from the viewpoints of those involved in this special occasion.

Let us share the intimacy of a wedding celebration from the “other” camera perspective — the bride’s. And at some point, the couple’s and the wedding party’s perspectives as well.

Watch the entirety of the professionally edited 29 minutes, 38 seconds of this GoPro-shot wedding or simply give the first 3 minutes a chance, then let’s see if you want to keep up with what’s next…

Best watched in HD (1080p).

Next time, we’ll upload the official wedding video with full coverage of our wedding celebration from the traditional perspective, then there will be a balance between the two points of view.

#riannephilipwedding
#GoPro
#wedding

Click here for:
Rianne and Philip Wedding Facebook Page
Rianne and Philip Wedding Website

Rianne & Philip Wedding Shot with GoPro Bridal Bouquet
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How does technology affect your life?

Shot December 2008, premiered June 2009… 6 years after premiere and 3 years after last award, Technophilia is still getting around. Check it out as “Film of the Day” for Viddsee, curated by Alem Ang.

technophilia 1
Shooting Format: 16mm

Screening Format: HD

Running Time: 7 minutes

Acknowledgments: Colorwheel Media Studios, Korean Film Council (KOFIC), Korean Academy of Film Arts (KAFA), and Korea University (KU), Asian Film Professionals Training Program, Hit Productions

You can check out more about the film via its Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Technophilia/178031655605594?fref=ts

Via its film blog: http://www.technophiliafilm.blogspot.com

Via IMDb: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1459060/

And Viddsee: https://www.viddsee.com/video/technophilia/ls76n

Technophilia Poster
Film poster by Joods Feliciano
Thank you to the KoBiz (Korean Film Council), Korean Academy of Film Arts, and Korea University for the support. Thank you to Seymour Sanchez for the opportunity to know about KOFIC. This is the unplanned, spur-of-the moment film that brought me to places. Thank you so much!
My Film ‘Technophilia’ is Film of the Day at Viddsee
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The Voices movie review

Direction
Story & Screenplay
Cinematography
Production Design
Sound & Music
Editing
VFX/Animation (if any)
Acting/Voice Acting
Social/Moral Elements
Average

“The Voices” is a disturbingly comedic piece that offers a risky mix of macabre madness, melancholy, and morbidity. Crossbreeding humor with horror in its own quirky manner, this genre mash-up exploring mental disorder and serial murder jumps between the fun and the unsettling.

This stylishly grisly feature presents a surreal portrait of an American psycho. The story revolves around the dark inner life of Jerry, a seemingly normal, hardworking factory worker who tries to impress his colleagues in his newfound work. Although seemingly living a typical bachelor’s life, his mental issues slowly manifest through his verbal discussions with his dog Bosco and his cat Mr. Whiskers. Recent company events lead him to pursue his attractive English co-worker Fiona, which triggers a killing spree done in insanely bizarre and idiosyncratic ways. As the body count increases, so do Jerry’s grotesque conversations with unlikely voices.

This thoroughly twisted motion picture provides a gripping look at mental illness without resorting to the typical elements found in many slasher materials. The production’s attention to details contributes much to the film’s zany stylization. Its demented sense of humor blends well with the bleak and disarming dread in Jerry’s life, which kind of helps align the audience with this weird murderer character’s sense of menace. Its wildly uneven tone maintains a creepy air while delivering severe shifts in moments of joy, sorrow, and gore in various scenes.

While reveling in its collision of moods and ideas, the film playfully dances around bright kitsch and pop sensibilities. The storytelling presents a dark comedy with a delightfully strange amalgam of flights of fancy and sheer madness. Its pink-hued small-town setting promotes fun scenerios where talking animals and fridge-bound heads offer wacky jaunts into lunacy, clearly providing a comparative look at Jerry’s visually dull reality. The visceral gore found in the tale works great with ghoulish humor, often mixing homicide moments with utter hilarity.

With Marjane Satrapi at helm, the presentation’s wildly uneven ability to go back and forth between comedic simplicity and ghastly absurdity clearly aims to disrupt the viewers’ sane minds. The dramatic sequences interestingly wander around how a mentally ill individual’s mind can possibly work in figurative ways.

This tonally wild indie picture has its odd share of laughs and shocks. No matter how subjective the impressions for the film gets — depending on people’s personal tastes and preferences — some may find this warped comedy nearly too horrifying to be funny. But even though the concept feels a bit strained at some point, the dynamics of the storytelling allows for a shift in gear as the tale progresses, or at least just before reaching absolute terror or annoyance in the affected scenes. These make the picture a workable psychological thriller and dark comedy that fittingly turns out comically offbeat come resolution time.

The director’s treatment yields a delicate balance to make the viewers care about a sick man trying to avoid the sinister’s path, and at the same time, make the same people worry about a serial killer’s descent into madness.

Ryan Reynolds in the lead role works as a deranged killer on the loose. His remarkable range in portraying a small-town worker suffering from schizophrenia promotes an uneasy balance between his character’s sense of bloody mayhem and his nice-guy demeanor. His comic chops combined with his cry-baby-to-butcher appeal creates an oddball performance that generally serves as an off-kilter treat, especially for black comedy fans. His voice performances both as his main character’s dog and cat are quite notable as well.

The supporting roles including those of Gemma Arterton, Anna Kendrick, and Jacki Weaver effectively tie with Reynold’s sick sense of humor. They are able to hold together the needed vulnerability and awkwardness to maintain the story’s disturbing charm.

For the most part, the film remains unpredictable. However, some crucial scenes, especially those at the latter part of the story, turn out otherwise.

The film’s compassionate portrayal of a serial killer lingers around the thin line separating the silly and the stylistic. Without being absolutely profound in intersecting horror and comedy in the material’s loopy turn of events, some of its murderous impulses suffer from intermittent insensitivity. But one thing’s for sure — its tongue-in-cheek narrative makes it a point that its premise will stick to the viewers’ heads even after the credits roll.

‘The Voices’ Film Review: Quirky morbidity
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The Hurt Locker list of Oscar wins

Direction
Story & Screenplay
Cinematography
Production Design
Sound & Music
Editing
VFX/Animation (if any)
Acting/Voice Acting
Commercial Flair
Average

The disclosing of the 2010 Academy Award Winner for Best Picture was without suspense as Tom Hanks opened the envelope and readily divulged “The Hurt Locker” as the film that garnered this year’s Oscar nod. Yet, it was full of surprises and intrigues as this relatively small film defeated the biggest contender for the award which was no less than the world’s highest-grossing film of all time to date — Avatar.

Director Kathryn Bigelow, writer Mark Boal, and producers Nicolas Chartier and Greg Shapiro accepted the award.

This Iraq war drama walked away with five more awards including Best Original Screenplay for Mark Boal, Best Film Editing for Bob Murawski and Chris Innis, Best Sound Editing for Paul N.J. Ottosson, Best Sound Mixing for Paul N.J. Ottosson and Ray Beckett, and for the record, the Best Director for the first woman filmmaker to ever receive the coveted Oscar for film direction — Kathryn Bigelow.

“The Hurt Locker” also received nominations for Best Actor for Jeremy Renner, Best Cinematography for Barry Ackroyd, and Best Original Score for Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders.

The other nine nominees for the Best Picture Award were: “Avatar,” “Inglourious Basterds,” “The Blind Side,” “District 9,” “An Education, Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire,” “A Serious Man,” “Up,” and “Up in the Air.”

Bigelow and the rest of her collaborators expressed how unreal and extremely humbling it was to receive the award and that they never imagined it in their wildest dreams. They also expressed their gratitude to their intrepid financier and fellow producer Nicolas Chartier who bet on the movie when no one else would. They also dedicated the award to the entire cast and crew. They reiterated their respect and honor to the people in uniform who dedicate their lives in service of the country. From the military to the firemen, they gave their utmost gratitude to them in their speeches.

As for the historical feat of Bigelow besting her award-winning compatriots including Quentin Tarantino for “Inglourious Basterds,” Jason Reitman for “Up in the Air,” Lee Daniels for “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire,” and her ex-husband James Cameron for “Avatar,” presenter Barbara Streisand made the historical announcement during the Oscar Night last March 7, 2010 with the words “Well, the time has come,” right before saying Bigelow’s name. Bigelow accepted the award with the words “There’s no other way to describe it. It’s the moment of a lifetime.”

Best Picture – The Hurt Locker,” Oscars.com

‘The Hurt Locker’ gets 2010 Oscar nods for Best Picture and Direction
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The film Aninag by Rianne Hill Soriano

To the staff and cast of Aninag:

Aninag is showing in two film fests this June 🙂 Thank you so much to all of you!!

The New York International Independent Film and Video Festival – Aninag is showing on June 26, 2005.
http://www.nyfilmvideo.com/cgi/schedule.cgi

The New York Filipino Film Festival - Aninag is showing along with The Memories of a Forgotten War on June 12, 2005, in celebration of the Independence Day
 http://www.theimaginasian.com/events/index.php#433
This is an article from Yehey.com:
 http://www.yehey.com/entertainment/movies/article.aspx?i=8170
 Date: 6/27/2005 8:20:49 AM

“Aninag” (“Light’s Play”)
a film by Rianne Hill Soriano

15 mins., 35mm Fantasy/Children New York International Independent Film and Video Festival 2005; Cinema Purgatoryo 2005; New York Filipino Film Festival 2005 Indiemand: The 1st Pi Omicron Independent Film Festival; Pelikula at Lipunan Film and Video Festival 2005

Isabel journeys in a dream world with her new mystical friends “Saya” (Happiness) and “Pag-asa” (Hope) in an attempt to overcome her isolation due to her blindness.

“Aninag” (“Light’s Play”) is a 15-minute narrative shost in 35mm film. Isabel, a blind girl who journeys in a dream world formed through the emotions she feels, plays with her new mystical friends “Saya” (Happiness) and “Pag-asa” (Hope). As they leave, Isabel succumbs to her negative thoughts. Her life becomes endangered. The question is: “How would she overcome her fear, helplessness, and depression in this struggling situation?”

“Aninag” (“Light’s Play”) is a film grant from the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA). Most of the film stocks used in the film came from Kodak Philippines through the filmmaker’s prize as Kodak Film Awardee 2003 of the UP Film Institute through her thesis film “Karsel” (“Prison”). With the help from production houses Filmex (through a number of short ends and lending of equipment) and Production Village (through a number of short ends), the film was greatly blessed with a good number of generous institutions and artists willing to help out with this kind of independent film production.

The film’s dream sequence was inspired by the storybook “Ang Ika-Sampung Taong Kaarawan ni Prinsesa Mayumi” (“Princess Mayumi’s 10th Birthday”), which the filmmaker originally wrote for the film.

The child actors were from the Advocacy Program of the Museo Pambata (an institution helping deprived, underprivileged, and street children and a museum for kids). The staff was proud of these three kids who each did a great job as first time actress/actor for a 35mm film.

Through the help of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR, Province of Rizal, Philippines), the City Hall of Antipolo and the Municipal Hall of Rodriguez, Rizal, the bulk of the film (dream sequence) was shot at the historical site of the Wawa Gorge, more familiarly known as the Wawa Dam, in San Rafael, Rodriguez (formerly Montalban), Rizal — where the legend of Bernardo Carpio’s “Dalawang Nag-uupugang Bato”(The Two Clashing Boulders) originated.

The Cast

Patricia de Silva – Isabel

Karla Pambid – Mom

Joel Torre – Dad

David Trinidad Jr. – Pag-asa

Rency Van Dorpe – Saya

Charisse Mara Luluquisin – Fairy dancer

Iroy Abesamis – Fear-fed shadowman

The Production Team

Rianne Hill Soriano – Screenplay and Direction

Wowie Hao – Director of Photography

Chrisel Galeno – Production Designer (Day 1 to 3)

Joy Puntawe – Production Designer (Day 1)

French Lacuesta and Joy Puntawe – Asst. Directors

Ron Dale – Editor

Philip Arvin Jarilla – Musical Scorer

Jason Galindez and Noel Bruan – Audio Engineers

Alda David, Rianne Hill Soriano and Mayleen Enorme-Menez – Production Managers

Iroy Abesamis – Choreographer

AG Sano, Rianne Hill Soriano and Philip Arvin Jarilla – Storyboard Artists

Rianne Hill Soriano – Original children’s storybook made for the film

Al Rio and Ojay Desuasido – Storybook Artists

The filmmaker would like to thank the NCCA, Filmex, LVN, Provill, Optima, Museo Pambata, Kodak Phils., Kontragapi, UP Film Institute, First Call, Sun for All Children, GiantSponge, City Hall of Antipolo, DENR (Rizal), Municipality of Rodriguez, the people of Wawa Gorge, and all those who helped us in the production.

My film ‘Aninag’ screens in the U.S.
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